The real definition of ‘travel’

Travel stuff

CC image via flickr: Iain Croll


Travel used to be considered exotic and only something hugely-adventurous people would do. In 1968, Simon Raven wrote “Travel: A Moral Primer” for The Spectator.

In it, he detailed the true definition of travel in the ‘then’ modern age, especially for students. Although very much of its time, some of the advice still rings true almost 50 years on.

“Travel is when you assess your money and resources and then set out, alone or with chosen friends, to make an unhurried journey to a distant goal… leaving only a post restante address [if that], and giving no date for your return.”

Raven goes on to list 7 important maxims to ensure your travel is as ‘real’ as possible. They are frightfully dated, but this one is particularly good and one I wish we could all live by in 2017.

“Courtesy requires that your parents should be told you are actually going, but you should imply it is a brief, safe trip… Keep your real route and destination strictly to yourself.”

Failure to take responsibility is the worst thing a boss can do

It probably won’t be a surprise to find I don’t particularly warm to Paul Nuttall and UKIP.

I don’t agree with their politics, so have very little time for them. However, recent news has made me have even less respect for the UKIP leader than ever.

I’m not talking about his pretence that he had close friends who apparently died at Hillsborough, which is pretty indefensible anyway.
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Hollywood, we have an editing problem

Still from Fantastic Beasts - Eddie Redmayne

I used to work in magazines and one of the things I loved about writing for them was that you had a fixed word count.

Being told a piece had to be 350 words long forced you to be economical with your writing and avoid padding out the piece.

TV has a similar restriction placed upon it – making a BBC sitcom means each episode has to be between 25-27 minutes.

On Sunday I went to see the new JK Rowling-penned wizarding extravaganza Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them.

It was thoroughly enjoyable, but for one thing: it ran to 133 minutes.

That’s two-and-a-quarter-hours!
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