It Kind of Blue me away

From the recording of Kind of Blue

When was the last time you actually sat and listened to an album? When I say ‘listened’, I mean stopped doing other things and really paid attention to the music.

Today, I went to a gig as part of the Brighton Festival called Played Twice: Miles Davis Kind of Blue, where – for the first half of the show – an audience of more than 400 sat and listened in rapt silence to a vinyl recording of what has been called the greatest jazz album ever.

The atmosphere was electric. It was a communal experience – so many people all sitting quietly concentrating on the music and nothing else – no phones, no chatting, nothing.

I’ve been to gigs before. I’ve been to jazz concerts before. But to sit with so many people and listen to a ‘record’ – not a live performance – was something quite special.

If you want to experience something similar, Played Twice happens regularly in London.

I’m going to trek through the Sahara in 2019

I’ve decided to do one of those mad challenges that people occasionally embark on. I’m going to be taking on a Sahara Trek next February – five days ploughing through arduous terrain in Morocco and it’s all in aid of The Brain Tumour Charity.

I promise not to bore you too much over the next year, but I will be sharing my ‘journey’, where appropriate.

I’m not exactly in great shape, so part of the challenge will be getting fit again and ready to spend hours in scorching temperatures, trudging through sand with a pack om my back.

It would be wonderful to be able to count on your support – there will be as many lows as there will be highs, I’m sure.

> And it’s dead easy to donate via my Justgiving page

Thank you!


JustGiving - Sponsor me now!

Why don’t banks target the younger generation any more?

Midland's Griffin from the 1980s

If you grew up in 1980s Britain, you’ll easily recognise the above yellow figure. The Griffin was the embodiment of Midland Bank (later to become part of HSBC).

One of the big selling points of Midland – if you were a kid – was the chance to join the Griffin Savers Club. It was a basic savings account, but you got a free sports bag, dictionary, file and more when you signed up.

First out of the blocks a couple of years earlier, Natwest also tried to encourage the youth of the 80s to become customers by launching their Piggy Bank scheme – the more money you saved, the more piggy banks you got.

As my generation grew up, the same banks tried to encourage us to upgrade to a full-on Student Bank account using a free Young Person’s Railcard or HMV vouchers as incentives.

Continue reading “Why don’t banks target the younger generation any more?”